The California Tribe was involved in a casino construction lawsuit

The California Tribe was involved in a casino construction lawsuit

The Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians were fined $207,000 by a California judge. The company failed to comply with court orders in its dispute with the construction contractor over the casino project.

According to a report on Law360.com, the tribe was fined by a California Superior Court Judge because it failed to comply with previous orders to produce documents.

The Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians have a casino in Northern California. There are 400 slot machines and table games at the location. The tribe has a convenience store and gas-ino across the street.

The original casino was built in 1994. The original casino was renovated into a Class III establishment in 2007.

One of Findelton’s companies was hired to fix roads during the renovations to prepare for the new casino.

The tribe was sued by Findleton to collect on the two completed contracts, plus compound interest.

Judge Moorman wrote in her decision that the day had come to use daily sanctions to enforce the order. The court invokes its inherent authority to manage discovery and enforce prior court orders by ordering the defendants to pay monetary sanctions in the amount of $207,000.

Judge Moorman denied Findleton’s motion for a court-ordered default judgment against the tribe and $3.37 million in damages.

The tribe believes that the matter should be in a tribal court. In January, it sued Judge Moorman in a California federal court, accusing her of ignoring tribal court orders.

In March, the judge urged the federal court to toss the lawsuit, claiming that the federal court does not have jurisdiction over it.

Summary:

A California judge has fined the Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians $207,000 for failing to comply with court orders in its dispute with a construction contractor over a casino project. The judge levied the fine because the tribe ignored previous orders to produce documents and go to arbitration with its former contractor, Robert Findleton.