There were suspicious betting alerts in the second quarter

There were suspicious betting alerts in the second quarter

During the three months to 30 June, some 226 of the alerts were created before a match started, while 44 were triggered after the end of events and 17 during play.

Green notifications are an alert based on suspicious odds movements that can be explained away.

There were more than 80 mid-level amber alert and 14 code red alert, which relate to the most serious alerts such as specific allegations of match-fixing. The requests for information from members and partners were included in the 33 remaining alerts.

Football was by far the sport of most concern during the second quarter of the year, accounting for over 250 of all alerts, some way ahead of other sports such as basketball, ice hockey, tennis, and volleyball.

In terms of where the reports were generated, 156 were in relation to events in Europe, with 59 in Asia, 33 in South America, 27 in Africa, five in Oceania, four in North America and three for international events.

A significant odds change was the main reason for alert raises. The wrong opening price and team-related news accounted for some of the motivation.

After detecting irregular betting patterns, GLMS raises an alert and then consults with members to investigate the reasons behind the odds changing. A formal report is produced when patterns cannot be justified.

A total of 20 reports were created during the quarter, four of which were developed and distributed by GLMS. Three more reports were produced after a request to facilitate internal investigation or intelligence gathering.

Summary:

Some 226 of the alerts raised during the three months to 30 June, were created before a match started, while 44 alerts were triggered after the end of events and 17 during play. The GLMS said 185 alerts were ‘green notifications’, which refers to an alert based on suspicious odds movements that later could be explained away. Football was by far the sport of most concern.